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Go Earn It Inc.

Go Earn It Inc is a sportswear apparel company. They wanted to update their customization software on their site from 2D to 3D, and expand their product lineup. I was tasked with taking their existing 2D design templates and translating them onto 3D models. Though listed as a graphic design job, in practice it was more similar to being a Texture Artist. I made UV maps for 3D models but was using my graphic design skills in order to execute it. I also made UV Map templates of models for other collaborators to use for texturing their models. In total, I textured 216 models.

The Process

Original templates were designed by Ben Lampe, Art Director. These were outlined in the form of the Wrestling Singlet. 

Design 126

Design NewDesign196

The process of making textures for models went like this: 

I received a base to make a UV template from for a model. I then received a design in the form of a template for a wrestling singlet. With these two, I worked in Adobe Illustrator to create both the templates and then placed design elements across the templates for different models. 

Then I went to Go Earn It's browser application for their 3D models, I applied a draft of my UV map onto the model, and then went back to Illustrator and made edits accordingly. This process continued until I was satisfied with how the design looked on the model, and that final product was what was submitted to my Art Director.

Models

Fight Shorts - NewDesign196

I translated those wrestling singlet designs onto a wide variety of models of sportswear. I had to pick and choose what design elements to apply to the model according to what would make visual sense.

 

As you may notice, the colors on the UV maps and the 3D models are different than the colors on the Singlet templets. This was because I was instructed to recolor the design elements to a limited palette using four specific Hexadecimal codes. This enabled the customization software to allow for color changes for the customer's needs. The exception to this rule was Logos because that design element would be interchangeable by what the customer needed.  

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